Denver Zoo Map

By Sam Polce, Denver Zoo Horticulture Technician

By Jennifer (Nixon) Preusser, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

Introducing this week’s feathered friend, George, the 17-year-old hamerkop (Scopus umbretta), who arrived last year with his mate from San Diego Zoo. The two live in the Rainforest Room of Bird World, Presented by Frontier Airlines.

You can distinguish George from his girlfriend because of his interesting “hairstyle.” Like his namesake from Seinfeld, he has a balding pattern of missing feathers on top his head. His girlfriend has distinctive white feathers that also set her apart in looks.

By Jessica Leckrone, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

This week’s feathered friend is Olaf, a snowy-headed robin-chat (Cossypha niveicapilla), also known as a snowy-crowned robin chat. Olaf hatched at the Toledo Zoo in July 2012 and arrived at Denver Zoo last year. Olaf finds himself at home in the very last exhibit inside Bird World, Presented by Frontier Airlines. He is currently the only snowy-headed robin-chat that calls Denver Zoo home.

By Jessica Leckrone, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

This week’s feathered friend is Sai, a female golden white-eye (Cleptornis marche).

Golden white eyes are found on the Mariana Islands of Saipan and Aguiguan, where they live in all-wooded habitats including the native limestone forest. Golden white eyes are seen in groups of two or four, which are thought to be small family groups

By Jennifer Nixon, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

Captain America is a blue-streaked lory (Eos reticulate) previously featured on this blog. Since his namesake is featured in the new Avengers movie coming out today, he is back in the spotlight.

By Jennifer Nixon, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

Introducing this week’s feathered friend, Peanut, the male chestnut-backed thrush (Zoothera dohertyi). Peanut hatched in 2013 in the swamp exhibit of Bird World, Presented by Frontier Airlines.

By Jessica Leckrone, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

Introducing this week's Feathered Friend, Hendrix, an American flamingo, also known as a Caribbean flamingo (Phoenicopterus ruber). Hendrix hatched at Denver Zoo at the Avian Propagation Building in 2008. He lives with a flock of 73 other birds and can be recognized by the green band with the number “29” on his right leg.

By Jennifer Nixon, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

By Katrina Eschweiler, Denver Zoo Grounds Technician 

“Feed me Seymour,” the famous words of Hollywood’s other worldly man-eating plant, Audrey 2, from Little Shop of Horrors, is one of the many exaggerations of carnivorous plants. The fiction world has characterized these plants as colossal, man-eating monsters with insatiable appetites, while in reality they are small, feeding only on insects and, in some cases, small vertebrates. What is a carnivorous plant, and what makes them so different from other groups of plants?

By Jessica Leckrone, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

Introducing this week’s feathered friend, Jackie, a 14-year-old Edward’s Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus capistrat).

She is one of 51 lorikeets that lives at Lorikeet Adventure, with a total of seven different species. You can recognize Jackie by her bright yellow chest feathers. The rest of her body is almost all green, with dark blue cheeks and chin. There is one other Edward’s Lorikeet at Lorikeet adventure, Jasmine.

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