Denver Zoo Map

By Shannon Block, President/CEO

I am always pleased when I see a successful release of an endangered animal safely back to its natural habitat. That happened this past week, when 30 rare, black-footed ferrets were reintroduced to the Rocky Mountain National Arsenal Wildlife Refuge by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

By Jessica Leckrone, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

Introducing this week’s feathered friend, Bruiser, a turquoise tanager (Tangara mexicana).

Bruiser is brightly colored with a strikingly blue body, a small dot of turquoise on his wings and a white chest. Some turquoise tanagers have a yellow chest. This species is native to South America. The “white bellied” turquoise tanager is more commonly found in Brazil while the “yellow bellied” can be found in Bolivia, Columbia, Ecuador, and Venezuela. They live in humid, lowland forests and are very social.

By Shannon Block, President/CEO

On September 10, Denver Zoo celebrated the arrival of two African lion cubs, a male and a female, who were born to lioness Neliah and her mate, Sango. These are Neliah’s first offspring, and under the watchful eye (via a closed circuit camera) of our incredible zookeepers and veterinary staff, her little family is thriving and bonding quite nicely behind-the-scenes in the Zoo’s Benson Predator Ridge exhibit.

By Shannon Block, President/CEO

I have fond memories of my childhood. I remember my grandpa had a garden and we would pick strawberries from it and eat them for breakfast. In addition to enjoying the sweet red berries fresh from the vine, I learned to appreciate watching something grow and seeing the fruits of your labor. Isn’t it funny how grandparents have a way of imparting life lessons with just the simplest of acts?

By Jennifer Preusser, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

Introducing Darla, this week’s feathered friend, a 28-year-old red-crowned crane (Grus japonensis). Some people consider this species to be a symbol of luck, longevity and fidelity and folklore says that they live for 1,000 years. In actuality, they live 50 to 70 years under human care and 20 to 40 in the wild. This is the heaviest species of crane, weighing up to 24 pounds, and they stand about 5 feet tall with a wingspan of up to eight feet. 

By Jessica Leckrone, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

By Shannon Block, President/CEO

Some fashionistas out there say you can’t wear white after Labor Day, but here at Denver Zoo we rock the white every day of the year. Take a trip here soon in your favorite white outfit to see how well you fit in with some of our chic creatures. Happy Labor Day!

By Shannon Block, President/CEO

Bernas, or “Junie,” one of our male Sumatran orangutans, is very playful and social, yet he can also have his mellow times. Like most orangutans, if you get a chance to catch his attention, you will notice he has especially expressive eyes that seem to draw you in.

By Jennifer (Nixon) Preusser, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

By John Murgel, Denver Zoo Horticulture Coordinator

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