Denver Zoo Map

By Jennifer Nixon, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

We’d like to introduce you to Lou, this week’s feathered friend. Lou is a female, blue-naped mousebird (Urocolius macrourus), a species formerly named blue-naped colies (Colius macrourus.) She turned seven this past February. Her keepers have grown very close to her after they spent a lot of time caring for her, following an accident that broke her leg. She is very small and only weighs 44 grams (about the weight of 9 nickels.)

By Jennifer Nixon, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

This week’s feathered friend is Beaky, a grosbeak starling (Scissirostrum dubium.) Beaky turns five this year, and is one of the smaller birds in our Rainforest exhibit. His feathers are charcoal-colored, but his beak and legs are bright yellow, and his rump feathers look like they have been dipped in red ink. You shouldn’t have any trouble spotting this bird because he is very active and is one of the noisiest birds in the room.

By Michael Stern, Denver Zoo Assistant Curator of Primates

Denver Zoo’s Director of Conservation Biology Amy Levine has been working in the Ha Giang province of Vietnam since 2009, partnering with the Ha Giang Forestry Protection Department and the University of Colorado Boulder, to assess where the needs of Tonkin snub-nosed monkeys and the local people intersect.

By Jessi Leckrone, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

This week’s feathered friend happens to be celebrating her 11th birthday this Sunday, August 24! Emerald, a hooded pitta (Pitta sordida), has lived at Denver Zoo since 2004, and hatched at Disney’s Animal Kingdom in 2003. She currently lives with her new mate, Oz, who joined us just a few months ago. You can distinguish between the two by the bands on their legs; Oz’s band is white, while Emerald’s is metal.

By Jennifer Nixon, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

This week’s feathered friend is the very special Caboose, a baby African pygmy goose (Nettapus auritus). This adorable duck hatched in Denver Zoo’s Avian Propagation Center on July 18. Caboose is unique because he is the first of his species born at Denver Zoo since we first began housing them in 1973. This species has proven very difficult to breed in the past.

By Jennifer Nixon, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

We’re excited to announce this week’s feathered friend, who happens to be a relatively new addition to Denver Zoo: Leo, a scarlet-faced liocichla (Liocichla ripponi).

By Jennifer Nixon, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

This week’s Feathered Friends highlights a species currently supported by one of Denver Zoo’s conservation projects in the United States -- the migratory piping plovers (Charadrius melodus.)

By Jennifer Nixon, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

Introducing this week’s feathered friend Salem, the double-wattled cassowary (Casuarius casuarius), also known as the southern cassowary. There are 3 subspecies of cassowary; the northern cassowary, the dwarf cassowary and the double-wattled cassowary. Members of the ratite family, cassowaries are related to ostrich, emu and rhea, all of which are flightless birds. They are second in size only to the ostrich.

By Jennifer Nixon, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

Introducing this week’s feathered friend, Toano. He is a male bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) that US Fish and Wildlife Service recovered from the wild in 2000 when he got West Nile Virus. His illness was severe enough that he would not have survived in the wild. After his rehabilitation he came to the Denver Zoo in 2002 and now he tells the plight of the bald eagle to everyone.

By Jennifer Nixon, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

Introducing a very tiny feathered friend, Victor. He is a violaceous euphonia (Euphonia violacea). Try saying that three times fast. Vio-lā-ceous U-phone-ia. I totally made that phonetic spelling up, hopefully it helps.

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