Denver Zoo Map

By Jennifer Preusser, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

This week’s feathered friend is Sue the hamerkop (Scopus umbretta), who came to Denver Zoo in 2014 with her mate, George, from San Diego Zoo. They live in the Rainforest Room of Bird World, Presented by Frontier Airlines. You can distinguish George from Sue because of his interesting “hairstyle.” Like his namesake from Seinfeld, he has a balding pattern of missing feathers on top his head. Sue has distinctive white “eyebrows” or feathers that set her apart in looks.

By Jennifer Preusser, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

Introducing D Reverend, the green-naped pheasant pigeon (Otidiphaps nobilis nobilis) and new resident here at Denver Zoo. D Reverend is a little over 1 year old. He is a popular resident of the Rainforest Room, since he is so active and frequently moves around the room, coming very close to people. He is joined by another green-naped pheasant pigeon named Myrtle. You can recognize D Reverend by his orange colored band.

By Jessica Leckrone, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

Introducing this week’s feathered friend, Lucy, the African pygmy goose (Nettapus auritus). Lucy is nine years old and lives in the third room inside of Bird World, Presented by Frontier Airlines. This room is known as the Jungle Exhibit and is considered a multi-species exhibit. Lucy lives with seven other species of bird. Lucy can be shy and secretive but she loves to be in her pool but will often hide under the log that hangs over. You may also see her under some of the plants in the room near the pool.

By Jennifer Preusser, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

By Jessica Leckrone and Jennifer Preusser, Denver Zoo Bird Keepers

This week’s feathered friend is also our newest tawny frogmouth (Podargus strigoides), Brittawny, also nicknamed “Chicken Pressernicken.” Her nickname comes from the noises she makes that sound like a chicken and a funny mash-up of keeper names. This is the fifth chick for the parents, dad Nangkita and mom Adelaide.

by Jennifer Preusser, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

This week’s feathered friend is a crowd favorite: peafowl. 

The peafowl are new to our flighted bird demonstration called “Winging It.” There are three chicks that star in the demonstration and they are named Sweet Pea (pictured), Garbanzo and Ham Sandwich. Sweet Pea and Garbanzo are both girls and Ham Sandwich is a boy. Garbanzo is the last bird in the video and is the sweetest peachick in temperament.

By Jennifer Preusser and Jessica Leckrone, Denver Zoo Bird Keepers

In honor of last weekend’s Halloween festivities, this week’s feathered friend is Poe, the green wood hoopoe (Phoeniculus purpureus), named after writer Edger Allan Poe. The five-year-old lives with his daughter inside of Bird World, Presented by Frontier Airlines.

By Jessica Leckrone, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

Introducing this week’s feathered friend, Juliet, a female Luzon bleeding-heart dove (Gallicolumba luzonica). Juliet can be found in the Jungle Exhibit, which is the third room inside Bird World, Presented by Frontier Airlines.

Juliet is considered one of many species of ground dove, so she spends most of her time walking, but early in the morning or later in the afternoon, you may find her perched mid-level in a tree. This where she feels safe to rest or take a nap.

By Jessica Leckrone, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

Introducing this week’s feathered friend, Bruiser, a turquoise tanager (Tangara mexicana).

Bruiser is brightly colored with a strikingly blue body, a small dot of turquoise on his wings and a white chest. Some turquoise tanagers have a yellow chest. This species is native to South America. The “white bellied” turquoise tanager is more commonly found in Brazil while the “yellow bellied” can be found in Bolivia, Columbia, Ecuador, and Venezuela. They live in humid, lowland forests and are very social.

By Jennifer Preusser, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

Introducing Darla, this week’s feathered friend, a 28-year-old red-crowned crane (Grus japonensis). Some people consider this species to be a symbol of luck, longevity and fidelity and folklore says that they live for 1,000 years. In actuality, they live 50 to 70 years under human care and 20 to 40 in the wild. This is the heaviest species of crane, weighing up to 24 pounds, and they stand about 5 feet tall with a wingspan of up to eight feet. 

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